April Wild West Trivia

The first Monday of each month I post a Wild West Trivia Question. Please leave your answer or best guess in the comment section of the blog post for a chance to win one of my books. At the end of the week, I’ll draw a name from all those who entered the contest and post the winner’s name in the comment section–be sure to check back to see who wins!

Crazy Horse 1840 – September 5, 1877 was the war leader of the Oglala Lakota. He took up arms against the U.S. Federal government to fight against encroachments on the territories and way of life of the Lakota people, including leading a war party to victory at the Battle of Little Bighorn in June 1876.
Four months after surrendering to U.S. troops under General Cook in May 1877, Crazy Horse was fatally wounded by a military guard, using his bayonet, while allegedly resisting imprisonment at Camp Robinson in present-day Nebraska. He ranks among the most notable and iconic of Native American tribal members and has been honored by the U.S. Postal Service with a 13¢ Great Americans series postage stamp.

Question: How did the famous Oglala Sioux war leader Crazy Horse routinely prepare for battle?

crazy horse

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18 thoughts on “April Wild West Trivia

  1. Zigzag streak of red earth ,top of forehead down ward andoneside of nose,done with one finger, striped his horse with mould from the earth also known for lighting bolt of yellow color in left side of face and white powder, would wet and put marks over vunerable areas ,when dried it looked like hailstones.

  2. Crazy Horse was also shown his “face paint” for battle, to consist of a yellow lightning bolt down the left side of his face, and white powder. He would wet this and put marks over his vulnerable areas; when dried, the marks looked like hailstones. His face paint was similar to that of his father, who used a red lightning strike down the right side of his face and three red hailstones on his forehead. Crazy Horse put no makeup on his forehead and did not wear a war bonnet.

  3. Crazy Horse attached a single feather to his hair, painted a lightening symbol on his face, and carried a small stone tied to his upper body

  4. Crazy Horse attached a feather to his hair, painted a yellow lightening symbol on his face with white powder and rub dust over his body.

  5. “Before going into battle Crazy Horse was to rub dust over his body.”

    “…he attached a single Eagle feather to his hair. When going into battle he painted a lightning symbol on his face and also carried a small stone tied to his upper body.”

    Just so fascinating!!!

  6. Crazy Horse never wore a war bonnet. He did not paint as the Indians usually do; but he made a zigzag streak with red earth from the top of his forehead, downwards and to one side of his nose at the base, to the point of the chin. This was done with one finger. It was a yellow lightning bolt down the left side of his face, and white powder. He would wet this and put marks over his vulnerable areas; when dried, the marks looked like hailstones. His face paint was similar to that of his father, who used a red lightning strike down the right side of his face and three red hailstones on his forehead. Crazy Horse put no makeup on his forehead. He also striped his horse with a mould from the earth. One of his animal protectors would be the white owl which, according to Lakota spirituality, would give extended life. And he was given a sacred song that is still sung by the Oglala people today and he was told he would be a protector of his people.

  7. He attached a single Eagle feather to his hair … streaked “face paint” with a yellow lightning bolt down the left side of his face … wetted the face paint to put marks over his vulnerable areas (looking like hailstones) … dusted white powder all over his body … and placed a black stone behind his horse’s ear so that he and his horse would be one in battle. Amazing….

  8. He attached a feather to his hair, painted a yellow lightning bolt on his face, rubbed dust over his body, and tied a stone to his body

  9. Crazy Horse was shown his “face paint” for battle, to consist of a yellow lightning bolt down the left side of his face, and white powder. He would wet this and put marks over his vulnerable areas; when dried, the marks looked like hailstones. His face paint was similar to that of his father, who used a red lightning strike down the right side of his face and three red hailstones on his forehead. Crazy Horse put no makeup on his forehead and did not wear a war bonnet. Lastly, he was given a sacred song that is still sung by the Oglala people today and he was told he would be a protector of his people.

  10. He wore a single feather in his hair and painted a lightening symbol on hi face and carried a stone tied to his upper body.

  11. I found 3 sources that each said a different thing. One said he often painted white spots on his face and wore sweetgrass in his hair.
    Another source said he painted a lighting bolt symbol on his face and wore a single feather in his hair.
    Another said he wore a stone tied around his upper body and covered himself with dust. However, on the day of the Battle of The Little Big Horn he wore no enhancements, face paintings, or arms for protection. So…. who to believe?

  12. Congratulations to Teresa Fordice–the winner of my April Wild West Trivia Contest!
    There’s a lot of info out there on Crazy Horse and it was fun to read everyone’s comments and see what information you found!

    Answer: Crazy Horse routinely painted a lightning streak on his face and hailstones on his chest. He also tied a small stone behind one ear and pinned a stuffed red-backed hawk to his hair.

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