Thanksgiving Horror Stories

Thanksgiving is right around the corner and Tom the Turkey is breathing down my neck!

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For most of my married life we’ve lived away from family. It was always “us” who traveled somewhere for the holiday. This year I live close enough to my relatives to be able to host Thanksgiving. I’m excited yet terrified the day will be a nightmare.

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I’ve got all my recipes picked out and I’ve made several grocery lists but the one thing I have no control over is making sure everyone gets along.

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There’s always that one person who starts an argument, brings up someone’s “Big Mistake” from the past or heaven forbid talks politics at the table.

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Let’s take a trip down memory lane…what’s the worst thing a friend or relative did at your Thanksgiving dinner?

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Until Next Time….
MarinSignature

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17 thoughts on “Thanksgiving Horror Stories

  1. This post was great πŸ™‚ I loved the illuatrations and your humor! Lol. When family gets together there is no telling what will happen, but thinking good thoughts and preparing for the best helps.

  2. It’s usually just us for Thanksgiving, but growing up my uncle was an alcoholic too. So holidays were dotted with appreciation.Christmas is usually when my family has the meltdowns!

  3. When out parents were alive, we had a giant tug of war. They lived in the same town, so we saw both, but alternated dinner with one from one year to the next. My mother in law was so jealous of my mom because Mom was so much better a cook. I swear my m-i-l timed how many minutes we were at each house. It was a constant headache trying not to slight anyone. Not that we are glad our parents are no longer alive, because I miss my parents a lot. But it’s so nice to stay home and most years be just our little family of four.

    • LOL, Caroline! The battle between the mother-in-laws would make a great scene in a book πŸ™‚ It’s tough pleasing everyone. I understand why some families celebrate two Thanksgivings–Thursday with one side of the family and Friday with the other–that’s a lot of turkey to eat!

  4. I don’t have any Thanksgiving horror stories, thank God! The worst would be that the food was cold. It is hard fitting everything in a regular sized oven! I don’t cook or host since my oven is old & unreliable. Darn!

    • Sharlene–I use my crock pots on Thanksgiving for the mashed potatoes–I have a make-ahead recipe that is to die for and the potatoes turn out great when they’re heated in the crock pot after they sat in the fridge the night before. I also use the crock pot to heat my chorizo stuffing. But it is hard to keep everything warm with one oven.

  5. I don’t have any holiday related horror stories involving people. (Unless you count the time my Aunt hosted the meal and got my mom’s turkey cooking instructions from her…and then added a FULL BOX of sage to the stuffing and told all her guests it was my mom’s recipe. My mom was quietly livid since it tasted awful! LOL) But we did have the water heater give out on Thanksgiving one year. Thank goodness my BIL is so good at fixing things. He and my hubby got a new one and had it installed before the dinner was out of the oven.

  6. I’m sure there have been times of ‘not so great’ thanksgivings. But I guess I’ve just chosen to not remember any specific things of past thanksgivings, other than good things.
    I remember the Thanksgivings after Mama, Daddy, my sister & I moved to Albuquerque. We always had thanksgiving dinner with Mama’s sister & her family. Betty Jo & Tommy always cooked the turkey, Mama did a ham. Tommy would do a ‘fancy’ dressing – oyster & whatever; Mama did a traditional cornbread dressing. And we always had pinto beans that Mama cooked, because my Daddy tho’t one had to have beans (he wasn’t a ‘must have potatoes’ man). And on more than one Thanksgiving, 2 – 4 airmen from Kirtland AFB were invited to the meal as well.
    My hubby was career Air Force, so many thanksgivings were spent away from family. One year, before we had children, we went out with another couple and had a thanksgiving dinner in a restaurant – traditional turkey & all with the leftovers sent home with us. Some years (after children) were spent with other Air Force families – in Germany, in The Netherlands. One year we were with a chapel group in Israel on thanksgiving. And we’ve eaten in the Military dining hall on thanksgiving.
    After retirement, hubby became a pastor, and our children married and have children of their own. So our thanksgivings have been varied — some altogether at our parsonage, some with in-laws of our daughter, some alone, some in restaurants. At our last church, several couples had started the tradition of bringing their dinner to the church and opening it up to the community for those who didn’t have a place to go. So for 4 years, hubby would cook a turkey, make dressing, and we’d take it to the church. We’d have 3 – 5 turkeys, couple hams, mashed potatoes, gravy, dressing, rolls and whatever other dishes anyone wanted to bring — and there would be 60 to 70 people there, both church people and even their extended families, as well as others (a young couple traveling thru town experienced car trouble and were stuck over the holiday, they saw our sign and came in; a daughter visiting her older mother – their expected guests for the day had to cancel so they decided to join us, and came back every year after, the daughter even started helping in the kitchen with potatoes etc).
    Last year, at our new church, hubby and I were invited to participate in a dinner with 4 other church couples and a single or 2.
    This year, we will be at our daughter’s for our GREAT-GRANDSON’s first thanksgiving — he will be all of 1-month old!

    • Donna–wow, you have eaten/shared your Thanksgiving in a lot of places with so many different people! I think it’s great that you’ve opened your hearts and the church on Thanksgivings in the past to those who might otherwise have eaten alone that day. And congratulations on your great-grandson! My grandmother lived long enough to see her great-grandchildren reach their teens years. Enjoy your time at your daughter’s this year–this Thanksgiving will be extra special for you πŸ™‚

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